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Adrienne Truscott’s Asking For It:
A One-Lady Rape About Comedy Starring Her Pussy And Little Else!

Adrienne Truscott (USA)

Adrienne Truscott’s Asking For It: A One-Lady Rape About Comedy Starring Her Pussy And Little Else! mixes humor, dance, video, and pussy-puppetry while undoing the rules and rhetoric surrounding rape and comedy.

Stepping outside the realm of an arts space, Adrienne straddles the world of stand-up and performance art in this one women show dressed only from the waist up and ankles down. With commentary from George Carlin, Louis C. K. and Robert De Niro, she takes on ducks, mini-skirts, rape whistles, Daniel Tosh, and Rick Ross all while drinking enough gin & tonics to get a girl in trouble.

Heavy at its core but light on its feet, Adrienne makes jokes about rape all night long…even if you ask her to stop.

 

“Brutal, brilliant and brave…if you miss it you will miss the moment in the history of stand-up comedy wherein a woman actually took the genre and did something with it that no man could do. This is without doubt the most powerful hour of comedy.” – The Scotsman (UK)

Coming Soon!

 

Adrienne Truscott is a choreographer, circus acrobat, dancer, writer and as of late, comedian. She has been making genre-straddling work in New York City and abroad for over 15 years and has performed at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival, Sydney Festival, Edinburgh Fringe, Soho Theater (London), Montreal’s Just For Laughs festival and most recently with sold out run at Joe’s Pub. She is one half of the infamous Wau Wau Sisters and has worked with cult cabaret legends Kiki and Herb, Meow Meow, and John Cameron Mitchell (Shortbus).
 
Adrienne is the winner of the Fosters’ Edinburgh Comedy Award 2013 Panel Prize for the premiere of Asking For It: A One-Lady Rape About Comedy Starring Her Pussy and Little Else.
 
Adrienne learned how to and continues to make work in terms of choreographic composition, an early application of form that seemed to allow for the most broad investigation, loose interpretation, and varied possibilities. This impulse remains strong because increasingly live performance strikes her as the most radical way to re-engage people’s attention—not just socially or politically, but personally, aesthetically, energetically; the most available way to trigger the act of paying attention. She engages many genres of live performance that look, act, and intend differently. Her work is held uniquely in common by this understanding of composition, enabling it to remain clear while being complex, sophisticated while accessible, available yet mysterious, personally unique while layered in abstraction, entertaining yet rigorous and serious about being humorous. She has consistently sought out different environments/mandates for her work rather than relegating it to specific economic, social, aesthetic, or geographic contexts. She is curious about how modes of presentation (i.e., experimental, international, commercial, or illegal venues) interact with different forms (dance, cabaret, circus, comedy) and how that can upend assumptions that often accompany these forms and their target audiences, respectively. She is attracted to the possibility of failure as a mandate for rigor.
 

Adrienne Truscott by Julieta Cervantes“I don’t like to say much about this show; I like it to speak for itself. So 
I’ll say this. This show debuted at the 2013 Edinburgh Free Fringe Festival, by design. It was unfinished, untested and unruly (like a fringe show could or even should be) and free so that people would take a chance on it regardless or because of initial impressions – as
a clarion call, a bad idea, a naked lady, a desperate fringe-y grab for attention, or worse, ‘feminist comedy’. The first time I cracked a joke about this topic was offstage among other women comics, while working off the coast
of Mexico on a cruise ship with 1800 lesbians on vacation. Two facts about that trip collided unexpectedly – it was an incredibly ‘safe’ space as a woman and an unpredictably conservative and treacherous space for a comedian. It was before making ‘rape jokes’ became the go-to for ‘edgy’ comedians. That trend hit while I was already wondering if I could use comedy to talk about rape or ‘rape culture’. It was prior to mattresses being carried on college campuses. Although best known as a cabaret and circus performer and choreographer, I had always wanted to try stand-up. I thought, instead of trying to do a tight 5 to 7 minutes at an open mic, why not debut with an hour of stand-up? And make it about rape. What could go wrong? No comic or anyone else for that matter wants to be told what they can or can’t say, nor should they be, obviously. It is often a comic’s job to utter the unutterable; that doesn’t mean they (we?) are beyond rebuke. Comedy is bold, powerful and supple but not beyond reproach or consequence. There is a difference between a fool and the fool in the king’s court. I may be both or neither, but my instincts for costuming are unassailable. – Adrienne Truscott

 

[LOGO in line with text]

The Creek and The Cave is a bar, restaurant, lounge and comedy theatre one stop from Manhattan in the heart of Long Island City. Our food is California Style Mexican, our Margaritas are strong and our vibe is funny.
The Creek and the Cave Logo
 
Since its founding in 2005, The Chocolate Factory Theater [Link to Website] has supported the development and presentation of new work by a community of local, national and international artists working in dance, theater, performance, and multimedia. The Chocolate Factory’s programs have drawn many thousands of new visitors to its 5,000 square foot industrial facility in Long Island City, Queens. The organization is currently planning for the purchase and renovation of a permanent facility in the neighborhood.
 
The Chocolate Factory is artist-founded and artist-led. Its founding Directors, Sheila Lewandowski and Brian Rogers, continue to create and present their own work at The Chocolate Factory while providing support to a close-knit community of forward-thinking visiting artists working at all stages of their careers.
 
The Chocolate Factory received an Obie grant in 2009. Its works have received Bessie and Obie Awards and have toured nationally and internationally.
The Chocolate Factory Logo
 

 

Last night was a proud moment for everyone here at PS122, as many of our artists and friends were recognized with Obie awards!

COIL 15 walked away big with:
CATCH winning an Obie and giving a moving speech that made us all realize why we’re here in the first place AND Andrew Schneider being awarded a special citation for YOUARENOWHERE at the Obie Awards!

Commissioned by PS122 and presented with The Invisible Dog Art Center, YOUARENOWHERE took COIL 2015 by storm. Schneider battled across unknown and glitchy virtual territories, warping linear timelines, transforming physical space and challenging any preconceived notions of the here and now.

Schneider has been creating original works for theater, video and installation since 2003. Rooted at the intersection of performance and technology, Schneider’s work critically investigates our over-dependence on being perpetually connected in an always-on world.

Big things are lined up for this whiz kid as Schneider and his techno savvy team are now getting geared up for a week at Mass Live Arts and PS122 GLOBAL touring in the Fall. But for now, some well earned celebrations are to be had! Congrats Andrew!

Here is Peter Musante, collaborator, accepting the award while Andrew is off in Belgium with The Wooster Group.
Peter Musante accepts the award for Andrew Schneider!

CATCH on the red carpet with photo by Ben Gansky.
CATCH by Ben Gansky

If you missed last week’s performance of LYFE you can live stream it on Lincoln Center’s streaming portal: http://watch.lincolncenter.org/pages/live-stream-lyfe

LYFE is an interactive music performance that explores the intersection of technology and the self with music created by Brooklyn band Glass Ghost.

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Jillian Peña
Dance, Multimedia

Residency dates: June 2 – 15
Public Showing: June 14, 6pm & 8pm
at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center
280 Broadway, Manhattan

Jillian Peña is a dance and video artist primarily concerned with confusion and desire between the self and other. Her work seeks to explore and expose the politics inherent in how bodies move and relate to one another. Inspired by Russian ballet, psychoanalysis, queer theory, pop media, and spirituality, Jillian believes in the power of dance to speak through history and reveal subtle dimensions of human character, in both the performers and the audience.
 
Panopticon is a duet that is simultaneously a solo and a work for 100 dancers. Utilizing virtuosic dancing within a set of mirrors and video projections, the performers will be multiplied to both highlight and objectify them. Inspired by the architectural concept of the panopticon – a structure in which everything is seen at all times – this performance aims to achieve omniscient visibility.

 
Click here for full RAMP 2015 artists and details.

 

Jillian Peña is a dance and video artist primarily concerned with confusion and desire between self and other. Her work is in dialogue with psychoanalysis, queer theory, pop media, and spirituality. Jillian was recently awarded the Prix Jardin d’Europe 2014 at ImpulsTanz Dance Festival in Vienna. She has been presented internationally, including at Danspace Project, the American Realness Festival, The Chocolate Factory, Dance Theater Workshop and The Kitchen in New York, and Akademie der Kunste Berlin, Centre for Contemporary Arts Glasgow, Modern Art Oxford, and the International Festival of Contemporary Art Slovenia. She was a Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Scholar during which she was awarded an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she was a fellowship recipient, and a Practice-based MPhil in Fine Art at Goldsmiths College, University of London. She has been an Artist-in-Residence at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Center (LMCC), Performance Space 122, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, Movement Research, the National Dance Center of Bucharest, Romania, Archauz in Århus, Denmark, and a DanceWEB Fellow at ImPulsTanz in Vienna. She is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Dance and in the College of Art, Media, and Design at University of the Arts, Philadelphia. jillianpena.com
 
Alexandra Albrecht is a freelance performer who has worked with many different artists in various mediums in NYC, nationally and internationally since the fall of 2007. She curated Dance at The Tank from 2009-12. She currently collaborates with Hilary Easton, Ryan McNamara, Jillian Peña and Ani Taj/The Dance Cartel. She holds a BFA in Dance and BA in Journalism from NYU and moonlights as a personal chef.
 
Andrew Champlin is a dancer and performer based in New York City. Originally from Portland, Oregon, Mr. Champlin graduated from Eugene Lang College, The New School for Liberal Arts with a BA in sociology and dance. Mr. Champlin has had the pleasure of working with a wide range of artists from various disciplines with whom he’s performed in the US, Europe and Asia; most recently, Jillian Peña, Ryan McNamara, Pam Tanowitz, Macklin Kowal, and Xavier le Roy. Andrew teaches ballet technique under the mentorship of Janet Panetta.
 
Sam Roeck is a visual artist and performer. His work has been shown at White Columns, 356 Mission, Josée Bienvenu Gallery, Elizabeth Dee Gallery, Recess Project Space, Envoy Gallery, The Times Square Arts Center, The Peoples Improv Theatre, and the Queens Comedy Center. As a performer he has appeared in work by Rebecca Patek, Kim Brandt, Liz Santoro, and Ryan McNamara. In 2012, he curated “Making Friends” a performance and dance series at Josée Bienvenu Gallery, NY. He is currently an MFA candidate at Hunter College in New York. He lives and works in New York.
 
Born in Ohio, Chris Sellers brings the Midwestern sensibility of attentiveness and honestly to her work and her life. There is a photo from before Chris was a year old where she is holding a book called “Little Photographer.” Even as a child, Chris has been seeing the world in images, always seeking to create beauty in any situation. Chris has been a Director of Photography since 2004, working in reality/format television (CNBC, Discovery Channel, National Geographic Channel, MTV, VH1, Travel Channel, History Channel, TLC). Leaving television to attend the American Film Institute in Los Angeles, it didn’t take long for her to realize that her true passion was in dissecting a story. It is storytelling that drives her, and she works like a psychologist to find those stories, even in small quiet moments.
 
“This work takes inspiration from the architectural concept of the Panopticon conceived of in the late 1700’s. English architect Jeremy Bentham designed this structure for use originally in prisons. It is a circular layout in which everybody can be seen at all times (pan = all, optic = seeing). Michel Foucault talks about the panopticon in his “Discipline and Punish,” and how it stands as a metaphor for the division and distribution of modern disciplinary power. Foucault predicted that the structure of the panopticon would be evidenced in social relations through bodies. ‘We are neither in the amphitheater, nor on the stage, but in the panoptic machine.’ He continues, ‘we are part of its mechanism.’
 
I want to investigate how we relate to this proposal today – as dancing bodies and as viewing bodies. What are performers showing, and what are we capable of seeing? I know this is not a new question, but rather one that is always changing and capable of reflecting contemporary culture. How is the panopticon an allegory for the politics of the self today? I want to approach these questions in relationship to technology. What is on view online, and who has the power? As we become more entrenched in social media, we become less in control of what we show.
 
Working with set + video designers, I will create a performance in which we see more of the dancers than we usually do – through reflections and multiplications using mirrors and videos. Creating a kaleidoscopic arena of these two bodies, they will simultaneously be seen as individuals and as objects. Through this uncanny gaze, Panopticon hopes to reveal subtle nuances of the dancers that are at once intimate and impersonal. When we see very personal pictures and stories of people online, they are immediately disconnected from an individual, and become a simulacrum, or substitute, of the experience. If we see a close-up photo of someone’s armpit, for instance, that is a very intimate part of the body – but in a photograph online, it is an impersonal symbol.” – Jillian Peña

About Gibney Dance
Gibney Dance brings the possibility of movement where it otherwise would not exist. Through three interrelated fields of action—Center, Company, and Community Action—Gibney Dance is “Making Space for Dance” in studios, on stages, and in underserved shelters and schools.
 
Center
Gibney Dance Centers are a powerhouse of cultural support for the performing arts community and the City itself. In 1991, Gibney Dance began leasing a studio in the historic 890 Broadway building to house Company rehearsals, and by 2011 the organization’s presence at that location had expanded to comprise an expansive eight-studio creative center. Today, with the addition of 280 Broadway, the organization directs a performing arts complex with two facilities: the Choreographic Center at 890 Broadway and Performing Arts Center at 280 Broadway. These remarkable spaces enable a robust roster of events designed to meet the needs of the dance field by fostering the creative process, encouraging dialogue, and providing professional development opportunities.
 
Company
Gibney Dance Company is the Centers’ acclaimed resident dance ensemble, led by choreographer Gina Gibney. Since its founding in 1991, the Company has developed a repertory of over thirty works that have been performed throughout the US and abroad. Gibney is known for using weighted, spiraling phrases to craft interpersonal dynamics between the dancers. These carefully calibrated relationships reflect the dancers’ experiences as community activists. As observed by writer Deborah Jowitt: “(t)hat Gibney’s troupe has long worked for the empowerment of battered women is reflected in the dancers’ struggles, their uncommon resilience, the support one readily offers another.” Highly sought-after by a wide range of performing arts institutions, the Company has been featured in recent years at Danspace Project (New York), White Bird (Oregon) the Yale Repertory Theater (Connecticut), L’Agora de la Danse (Montreal, Canada), and Internationale Tanzmesse (Dusseldorf, Germany).
 
Community Action
Gibney Dance Community Action provides New York City domestic violence shelters with over 500 free movement workshops each year. At these workshops Company members share activities that draw from artistic practices to address issues of choice and self-expression. Community Action was initiated in 2000 in collaboration with Sanctuary for Families and Safe Horizon, two of the country’s most prominent domestic violence organizations. Widely regarded as a model in the field, Community Action’s methods for integrating arts and social action are distributed nationally—via our Institute for Community Action intensive that annually hosts dancers from across the US—and internationally—through Global Community Action Residencies, most recently in Cape Town, South Africa.

1

RAMP artists are commissioned by Performance Space 122 with support from the Jerome Foundation. Dance programming support provided by Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Harkness Foundation for Dance and Jerome Robbins Foundation. RAMP 2015 is supported by Gibney Dance.

Website Feature_ROKE-ArtofLuv2

May 05

ROKE

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Royal Osiris Karaoke Ensemble
Multimedia, Performance

Residency dates: June 16 – 29
Public Showings: June 27 & 28, 6pm
at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center
280 Broadway, Manhattan

Royal Osiris Karaoke Ensemble (ROKE) is a musical priesthood that explores the metaphysics and mythologies of love, desire and courtship at the end of the 20th century. Appropriating strategies of installation art, opera, and theater, ROKE creates multimedia performances with original music to create modern-day rituals from found text and video sources.

In Starbucks Infinity, the Ensemble finds themselves inside of a trans-dimensional space made from images of Starbucks as featured in popular romantic comedies and YouTube videos. By rebuilding the popular retail store with digital tools, the Ensemble will create an ever-shifting psychedelic wormhole in which characters from different films and commercials interact over a cup of coffee. By appropriating the most generic of meeting-places, the Ensemble will reconstitute the psychic landscape of the Experience Economy and confront the question of what it means to be truly #basic.

 
Click here for full RAMP 2015 artists and details.
 

 

 

Royal Osiris Karaoke Ensemble (Tei Blow and Sean McElroy) [ROKE] is a musical priesthood that explores the metaphysics and mythologies of love, desire and courtship at the end of the 20th century. By appropriating strategies of installation art, opera, and theater, ROKE creates multimedia installation- performances with original music to create modern-day rituals from found text and video sources.
 
ROKE was formed when Brown hosted Oberlin for the 2001 Liberal Arts Spring Fling. They went on to cement their partnership a year later when they both enrolled in the low-residency Masters program in Women’s Studies at Stanford-Hofstra-University of Phoenix-Online. All of their performance work is a development of their collaborative thesis project, Isis As-Is: Du Darwinisme Féminin au Post-Humanisme. ROKE was awarded Best Original Song Not Written by Thoth in 2561 by the Horus Council, and nominated for Best Underwater Spectacle in 2057 for their performance He is I, A Man’s Story, which premiered at the annual Opening of the Mouth Ceremony at the Temple of Khonsu in Thebes.
 
ROKE has also performed rituals at FringeArts (Philadelphia), Under the Radar Festival’s Incoming! Series, Gibney Dance Center, Kate Werble Gallery, Special Effects Festival/Participant Inc., Prelude Festival, AUNTS Arts@Renaissance, and JACK. ROKE has been awarded a Franklin Furnace Fund grant (2013) and a BAX Space Grant (2014). They are part of the Public Theater’s Devised Theater Working Group and PS122’s RAMP residency program. They spent the summer of 2014 at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. ROKE’s next projects include a Steve Reich/Wilhelm Reich tribute album produced in collaboration with Kanye West.

The RAMP residency will be used to re-envision the architecture of a white-walled gallery space as a diagram of a wormhole and project a simulation of the Starbucks environment into it, mapping scenes from popular films in which the Starbucks brand features prominently. We plan to use the space to devise a scenic construction and projection-mapping scenario that works to create a seamless or non-seamless projection and video compositing system. We will also plan to devise a method of music spatialization drawing from our earlier experiments in surround-sound psychedelia.

About Gibney Dance
Gibney Dance brings the possibility of movement where it otherwise would not exist. Through three interrelated fields of action—Center, Company, and Community Action—Gibney Dance is “Making Space for Dance” in studios, on stages, and in underserved shelters and schools.
 
Center
Gibney Dance Centers are a powerhouse of cultural support for the performing arts community and the City itself. In 1991, Gibney Dance began leasing a studio in the historic 890 Broadway building to house Company rehearsals, and by 2011 the organization’s presence at that location had expanded to comprise an expansive eight-studio creative center. Today, with the addition of 280 Broadway, the organization directs a performing arts complex with two facilities: the Choreographic Center at 890 Broadway and Performing Arts Center at 280 Broadway. These remarkable spaces enable a robust roster of events designed to meet the needs of the dance field by fostering the creative process, encouraging dialogue, and providing professional development opportunities.
 
Company
Gibney Dance Company is the Centers’ acclaimed resident dance ensemble, led by choreographer Gina Gibney. Since its founding in 1991, the Company has developed a repertory of over thirty works that have been performed throughout the US and abroad. Gibney is known for using weighted, spiraling phrases to craft interpersonal dynamics between the dancers. These carefully calibrated relationships reflect the dancers’ experiences as community activists. As observed by writer Deborah Jowitt: “(t)hat Gibney’s troupe has long worked for the empowerment of battered women is reflected in the dancers’ struggles, their uncommon resilience, the support one readily offers another.” Highly sought-after by a wide range of performing arts institutions, the Company has been featured in recent years at Danspace Project (New York), White Bird (Oregon) the Yale Repertory Theater (Connecticut), L’Agora de la Danse (Montreal, Canada), and Internationale Tanzmesse (Dusseldorf, Germany).
 
Community Action
Gibney Dance Community Action provides New York City domestic violence shelters with over 500 free movement workshops each year. At these workshops Company members share activities that draw from artistic practices to address issues of choice and self-expression. Community Action was initiated in 2000 in collaboration with Sanctuary for Families and Safe Horizon, two of the country’s most prominent domestic violence organizations. Widely regarded as a model in the field, Community Action’s methods for integrating arts and social action are distributed nationally—via our Institute for Community Action intensive that annually hosts dancers from across the US—and internationally—through Global Community Action Residencies, most recently in Cape Town, South Africa.

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RAMP artists are commissioned by Performance Space 122 with support from the Jerome Foundation. RAMP 2015 is supported by Gibney Dance.

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