Andrew Schneider

World Premiere

Theater, Multimedia

Jan 8 - 17

YOUARENOWHERE
Andrew Schneider (NYC)

A conjuror of futuristic shamanism, Andrew Schneider’s YOUARENOWHERE experiments with the virtues of sensory overload via quantum mechanics, parallel universes, and Craiglist’s “Missed Connections”. Battling glitchy transmissions, crackling microphones and lighting instruments falling from the sky, one guy on a mission and a tricked-out interactive new-media landscape merge to transform physical space, warp linear time and short-circuit preconceived notions of what it means to be here now.

Created by Andrew Schneider with
Peter Musante, Christine Shallenberg and Omar Zubair
Produced by Shelley Carter

“a frenetic, witty, disorienting explosion of linear time” – Culturebot

60 minutes.

 

 
 

Andrew Schneider has been creating original works for theater, video, and installation since 2003. Rooted at the intersection of performance and technology, Schneider’s work critically investigates our over-dependence on being perpetually connected in an always-on world. He creates and performs solo performance works, large-scale dance works, builds interactive electronic art works and installations, and was a Wooster Group company member (video/performer) from 2007-2014.
 
Recently, Andrew was the recipient of the Tom Murrin Performance Award, and will be creating a new experiential light and space performance piece (currently titled Unified Field Theory) as Artist-In-Residence at Dixon Place Theater and in cooperation with Abron’s Arts Center throughout 2015/16.
 
Andrew’s original performance work in NYC includes FIELD (2014), TIDAL (2013) curated by Laurie Anderson as part of the River to River festival; YOUARENOTHERE (work-in-progress, 2013) at the Performing Garage; WOW+FLUTTER (2010) at The Chocolate Factory Theater; five AVANT-GARDE-ARAMA! works (2005-2013) at PS122; PLEASURE (2009) at Issue Project Room; and resident artist (2006) at LEMURplex. His work in Chicago includes TRUE+FALSE (2007) and STRATEGIES AGAINST ARCHITECTURE (2008) among others, both at The University of Chicago as a resident artist.
 
Andrew creates wearable, interactive electronic art works such as the Solar Bikini, (a bikini that charges your iPod), and wireless programmable sound effect gloves. His interactive work has been featured in such publications as Art Forum and Wired, among others and at the Center Pompidou in Paris.
 
Andrew also works with various musical acts including Fischerspooner (projections/performer), Kelela (projections/lighting), and AVAN LAVA (lighting/percussion/vocals). Schneider has served as an Adjunct Professor at NYU and has taught courses on Technology and Performance at the Interactive Telecommunications Program and at Bowdoin, and Carleton Colleges. Andrew holds a BFA in Theater Arts from Illinois Wesleyan University and a Masters Degree in Interactive Telecommunications from NYU. He lives in New York City
http://andrewjs.com

 

 

The Invisible Dog Art Center The Invisible Dog Art Center is housed in a three-story former factory building in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn. Built in 1863, our 30,000 square foot facility has been the site of various industrial endeavors – most notably a belt factory that created the famous Walt Disney invisible dog party trick, from which they take their name. The building remained dormant from the mid 1990’s to 2009 when founder, Lucien Zayan, opened The Invisible Dog.
 
The Invisible Dog is dedicated to the integration of forward-thinking innovation with respect for the past. In 2009 the building was restored for safety, and has been maintained over the years, but otherwise preserved in tact from its original 1863 form. The rawness of the space is vital to the space’s cultural identity.
 
The ground floor is used for exhibitions, performances and public events, featuring artists and curators from round the world. This floor also includes a new pop-up shop, designed by artist-in-residence Anne Mourier, conceived as a new home for independent, commercial designers in various fields. The second floor and part of the third floor are divided into over 30 artists’ studios.The third floor, luminous and spacious is used for private events, exhibitions, performances and festivals. Finally, the Glass House is a brand new, seasonal exhibition space dedicated to featuring the work of female-identified artists.

 

 

 

The Invisible Dog Art Center is located in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn and is accessible by the F and G subways. This cool and calm region on the northwest side of Brooklyn is home to roughly 20,000 residents. Invisible Dog Art Center sits one block from Dean Street and two blocks from Atlantic Avenue, both boasting a plethora of bars and restaurants.
 
Boerum Hill claims a trendy stretch of Smith Street as its own, and small cafes and stores are dotted throughout the neighborhood’s interior, like the restaurant Building on Bond and the Brooklyn Circus boutique. Some staff picks include: 61 Local, just next door at 61 Bergen Street! Hancos, 85 Bergen St & 134 Smith Street (2 locations); Van Leeuwen, 81 Bergen Street; Bien Cuit, 120 Smith Street; Van Horn Sandwich Shop, 231 Court Street; Ki Sushi, 122 Smith Street.

 
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YOUARENOWHERE was commissioned by PS122 and Mass Live Arts with support from the Jerome Foundation, by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts – Art Works, and was made possible in part by New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Development residency provided by Mass Live Arts, an AIRspace residency at Abrons Arts Center, and a space residency at The Bushwick Starr.

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